Posts Tagged ‘Blooming’

Flowering Orchids in Autumn

Autumn brings shorter days and cooler temperatures.  Vandas, cattleyas, oncidiums, dendrobiums, phalaenopsis, paphiopedilums (and their hybrids) are just a few of the autumn-blooming orchids.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Orchid Care, Orchids, Orchids Care, Growing Orchids, Orchid Care and Maintenance

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Orchid Care Basics: What Kind of Orchid Is it?

The best way to care for your orchid is to know exactly what kind of orchid you have.  But what do you do if you don’t know what kind of orchid you have?  Easy!  Narrow things down by determining your orchid’s growth pattern.

How Do Orchids Grow?

There are two basics growth types for orchids–Monopodial and Sympodial.


Monopodial (Latin for “single foot”): Orchids with a main stem that continuously grow upward.  Flower spikes, or inflorescences, alternate from one side of the stem to the other.  Angraecus, Phalaenopsis, and Vandas are monopodial orchids.

Sympodial (Latin for “many footed”): Orchids that grow sideways along the surface.  Psuedobulbs grow from the base (the connecting stem is called a rhizome) and mature at the end of the growing season by flowering.  Cattleyas, Dendrobiums and Paphiopedilums are sympodial orchids.

Learn more about these Orchid varieties with Ryan’s Free Orchid Care Cheat Sheets. They come in so handy when I just want a quick refresher on orchid care!

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

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Orchids and Growing or Planting Fragrant Varieties

Orchids and growing or planting fragrant varieties.

Aerangis
These are smaller sized orchids that are very fragrant in the evening hours.

Aerides
These tall lanky orchids can have good fragrance that need to be careful because some of them do not.

Ancistrochilum rothschildianum
This is a small species that is deciduous during winter.

Brassavola
The popular lady of the night orchid is out of the Brassavola species which include other orchids that give off their sense in the night.

Brassia
Not only smells good but it is striking to with its large spiderlike flowers.

Brassidium
These brassia hybrids are nicely scented and very popular today.

Brassocattleyas
A cross between cattleya and barcarole, these files can be very strongly scented.

Catasetum
This large deciduous plant bears male or female flowers and has many species that are quite fragrant concluding the tenebrosum and pileatum. There are also many popular hybrids that are very fragrant as well.

Cattleya
The most fragrant species this orchid can be iricolor, bicolor, dowiana, labiata, maxima, schilleriana, warscewiczii and mossiae. Some of the hybrids can be intensely fragrant.

Clowesia
These orchids lose their leaves during the winter time and have many species which are scented.

Dendrobium
A popular genus of orchid having tall canes which those leaves in winter. Most of this species of orchid or scented and you might recognize some of the more popular ones which include monoliforme, speciosum, nobile, kingianum, loddigesii and parishii.

Dendrochilum
these orchids have chains of tiny flowersand many of the species assented including the magnum, glumacaeum and cobbianum.

Gongora
These small and highly fragrant species can be rather short-lived.

Haraella odorata
These of a popular miniature orchids which are very fragrant.

Sedirea japonica
Cultivated in Japan these orchids can be on the small side and rather long but are highly fragrant.

Vanda
these orchids are harder to grow in northern regions and a big long a real roots. The smaller scented species include suavis, denisonia, cristata and tessellata.

Zygopetalum
Consisting of complex hybrids the species are highly scented with wonderful fragrance.

Planting orchids or growing them in pots can be a challenging but rewarding experience and with these species you’re sure to get a nose-full!

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Orchid Care, Orchids, Orchids Care, Growing Orchids, Orchid Care and Maintenance

+ Article Base Gardening

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3 Simple Ways to Get Longer Lasting Blooms on Your Orchids

1. Keep your orchids away from ripening fruit.

When fruit ripens, it releases ethylene gas, and ethylene gas can cause the flowers on your orchid
to fade… and many times even collapse!

3. Keep your blooming orchids cool.

You can extend the blooming period of your orchids by introducing them to *slightly* cooler temperatures – not above 75F (24C) – once they begin blooming.

4. Keep blooming orchids away from pollinating insects.

As soon as orchid flowers come in contact with bees or other flying insects, they’ll begin to die
almost immediately after they’re pollinated.

** Sign up for Ryan’s Growing Orchids Email Newsletter to receive even MORE Tips to Strrrretch the blooming period of your orchid even further…

Of course, you can get all the tips & secrets right now in his book… (including all his “juiciest” primo tips – which are NOT covered in his newsletter…)

The book is available in either downloadable, ebook format, or as a “real” hard copy book sent
to you in the mail.

AND, for a limited time, you’ll receive 2 FREE BONUSES with your book when you order today.

To order or simply learn more, visit: Orchids Made Easy.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

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Orchid Care and Maintenance Tips: Broken Leaf or Spike / Stem

Here’s a reblog post from the Just Add Ice blog:

It happens. You drop something on your orchid plant, or perhaps the whole pot gets knocked over or dropped. Maybe it gets damaged on the way home from the nursery, or a pet or child gets a little to inquisitive. Whatever the case, orchids survived and thrived in the wild for a long, long time, so they can’t possibly be as fragile as they seem. Here’s how to deal with broken leaves or stems with proper orchid care.

A broken leaf shouldn’t cause any harm to your Phalaenopsis orchid plant. But if you want to cut it off for display purposes, you should do it carefully. Use a sterile knife or scissor to prevent infection, and cut it a half-inch from the central stem.

If one of the flowering stems has broken, you might be tempted to wrap some tape around it and pretend it didn’t happen, but it’s not likely to stay unnoticed for long. Besides, leaving it like that invites infection, which could do a lot more damage.

Instead, cut the orchid flower spike above where it has broken, and put it in a vase with water, like you would with any cut flower. Then, remove the remaining broken flower spike down to the base of the orchid. This will encourage new flower spikes to grow.

Many orchid lovers recommend putting some cinnamon on the broken end for it’s antimicrobial properties.  (Read about my Listerine Orchid Care home remedy here). New blossoms may take up to a year to appear, but as long as the leaves and roots of your orchid are healthy, you will get new flowers eventually!

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Orchid Care, Orchids, Orchids Care, Growing Orchids, Orchid Care and Maintenance

+ Just Add Ice Blog Tip

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Orchid Plant Blooming : Time Lapse Video

A friend emailed me a link to this remarkable video of a blooming orchid.
The video was filmed over the course of 8 days.

AMAZING! :-)

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Orchid Care, Orchids, Orchids Care, Growing Orchids

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Orchid Flowers and Bud Blast

Orchid, Orchids, Bud BlastOrchids are sensitive to any sudden changes in their environment – and they’re particularly sensitive to rapid changes in temperature.

One of the most common reasons why a newly purchased orchid will suddenly lose its flowers is because the plant goes through “shock” when it is suddenly introduced to a new environment – namely your home.  Healthy orchid plants with buds that shrivel and fall off the stem before they have a chance to open suffer what’s called “bud blast.”

The photo to the left is of a phalaenopsis orchid suffering bud blast.

You can prevent bud blast and flower blast by closely monitoring your orchids temperature changes (see my special post, Orchid Care and Maintenance Tips : Temperatures for Orchids for more info.)  Protect orchids from sudden cool and heat temperatures changes like strong air conditioning/heating or drafts from windows/doors.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :-)
The Orchid Care Lady

Orchid Care, Orchids, Orchids Care, Growing Orchids, Orchid Care and Maintenance

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