Posts Tagged ‘Growing Orchids’

Orchid Care Tips: Non-Toxic Insecticide

To spray your orchid plants to deter insects – in place of more toxic chemicals.

4 cups canola oil or vegetable oil
7 table spoon eucalyptus oil
2 cups water
2 teaspoon dish soap

Mix together & shake well. To use add 3 tablespoon of mixture to 4 cups of water and spray.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

Share

Orchid Care Basics: What Kind of Orchid Is it?

The best way to care for your orchid is to know exactly what kind of orchid you have.  But what do you do if you don’t know what kind of orchid you have?  Easy!  Narrow things down by determining your orchid’s growth pattern.

How Do Orchids Grow?

There are two basics growth types for orchids–Monopodial and Sympodial.


Monopodial (Latin for “single foot”): Orchids with a main stem that continuously grow upward.  Flower spikes, or inflorescences, alternate from one side of the stem to the other.  Angraecus, Phalaenopsis, and Vandas are monopodial orchids.

Sympodial (Latin for “many footed”): Orchids that grow sideways along the surface.  Psuedobulbs grow from the base (the connecting stem is called a rhizome) and mature at the end of the growing season by flowering.  Cattleyas, Dendrobiums and Paphiopedilums are sympodial orchids.

Learn more about these Orchid varieties with Ryan’s Free Orchid Care Cheat Sheets. They come in so handy when I just want a quick refresher on orchid care!

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

Share

Identify an Orchid: Q & A

Question: Is it possible to identify an orchid from a photo? I have a plant that my mother left me when she died 30 years ago, and I have never known its name. — Norman H.

Answer: Plants with lost name tags are a common occurrence in the orchid world. Though the original grower always puts a ‘genera/hybrid/variety’ identification label on each plant in production, it seems that this important information often gets lost along the way.

Over the years, the orchid may be re-potted and split into pieces but the owner doesn’t write a new tag for each division. Before long, there are nameless plants in circulation everywhere.

Some orchids are immediately identifiable by an expert seeing the flowers. Occasionally, the foliage alone yields the name. The vast majority of no names, however, remain as such due to the hundreds of thousands of possible hybrids.

A rank novice can determine the genera of common orchids strictly from the foliage. Cattleyas, dendrobiums, and oncidiums all have tell-tale pseudo-bulb shapes while phalaenopsis and paphiopedilums have uniquely tapered leaves. Even less common types such as cymbidiums, miltonias, and vandas are easy to identify.

The exact hybrid name is much more challenging unless the plant was mass-produced by cloning, in which case the variety might also be known.

Need to identify an orchid?  Check out Ryan’s Free Orchid Care Sheet Cheats when you purchase his book Orchids Made Easy.   Learn more about his free growing orchids email newsletter here.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

+ Arthur Chadwick Richmond Times Dispatch

Share

Growing Orchids Indoors for Beginners : Bringing Your New Orchid Home

As I mentioned in yesterday’s post (Growing Orchids : Selecting a Healthy Orchid, read it here), today I’ll be sharing a tip I learned from Ryan’s Orchid Care email tips that saved my entire orchid collection from death!

I don’t want to keep you in suspense too long–especially since I know it will help save your orchids too!

Now, this orchid care tip is incredibly simple, but I can’t emphasize how important it is to follow.

Growing Orchids, orchid care, growing orchids for beginners, growing orchids indoors, orchid care and maintenanceALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS quarantine your new orchids from your existing plants for at least 3 weeks.  I don’t care if you bought it from the most reputable orchid dealer in the world!  NEVER place a new orchid near your other indoor/outdoor orchid plants.  Separating your plants for at least 3 weeks will help you inspect them for any signs of orchid pests or diseases that might not have been visible when the plant first arrived in your home.  Remember to pay close attention to the underside of the leaves, 3 weeks is just enough time to see if any insect eggs have hatched.

If you’ve ever dealt with orchid diseases and orchid pests you will realize how frustrating and difficult it can sometimes be to have to care for orchids that are “sick”.  Keep your orchids healthy by providing them the ideal care environments : temperature, humidity, light, water, etc.  AND REMEMBER, always quarantine your new orchids!

For more detailed information, I recommend you read Chapter 2 in Ryan’s book Orchids Made Easy.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :-)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

Share

Growing Orchids Indoors for Beginners : Selecting a Healthy Orchid

I ran into a good friend over the weekend.  We got to talking about growing orchids (of course!) and how popular they’ve become in recent years.  Here in Florida, you can find orchids at the supermarket, Walmart, even the Home Depot!

It is extremely important to note that while the employees may mean well, most don’t know how to look after orchids properly.  They care for orchids the same way they care for all of the other plants or flowers in the store–and as we all know, orchids require a special kind of care!

It is easy for orchid problems, diseases and pests to spread when orchids are not happy in their environment.   So, how do you go about selecting a healthy orchid from the bunch?  Here’s what I would recommend.

Growing Orchids, Growing Orchids Indoors, Growing Orchids for Beginners, Orchid Care, Orchid Problems

Growing Orchids Indoors for Beginners : Selecting a Healthy Orchid :

1. Orchid Flowers : Examine the flowers for any sign of wilting.  Damaged flowers could mean there are bigger problems (like damaged root systems) lurking.  I personally buy orchid plants with healthy buds (if possible).  I know the plant has not experienced any bud blast and I can watch my new orchid baby bloom (which I love!). :-)

2. Orchid Leaves : Avoid plants with damaged leaves–leaves should be stiff and deep green–not yellowing, soft, wrinkled or spotted.

3.  Orchid Roots : Healthy roots = a healthy orchid  plant.  Avoid plants with black, squishy roots.  These orchids have been overwatered and will require immediate attention and special care.

4. Orchid Plants : Examine the overall plant (leaves, stem, flowers, roots) and even quickly inspect the plants nearby for orchid pests and diseases.  Look for unsual spotting on leaves and flowers caused by fungus, bugs lurking underneath leaves, or other signs of disease.

Don’t miss tomorrow’s post Growing Orchids Indoors for Beginners : Bringing Your Orchid Home — I’ll be sharing a tip I learned from Ryan’s Orchid Care email tips that saved my entire orchid collection from death!  See Chapter 2 in his book Orchids Made Easy, for detailed information.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

Share