Posts Tagged ‘Problems’

Orchid Care Video: Helpful Spices!

Ryan over at OrchidsMadeEasy has a great video I just had to share here. This video shows just how easy it can be to care for your orchids. Who says you have to go out in search of special orchid chemicals? Sometimes all you need is to grab something from your kitchen cabinet! So go ahead, watch the video below to see which spice can treat and prevent diseases in your orchids! So simple, easy, and natural!

Want to learn more? Don’t miss Ryan’s Free Orchid Care Email Tips.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :-)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

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Orchid Care and Maintenance : Falling Orchid Flower Buds

Things have been so hectic around here lately (family friends came to Florida for a visit) that I’ve gotten a bit behind in answering my orchid care emails.

So, rather than respond to everyone individually, I figured I could respond to emails right here on the blog.

Today’s Orchid Care and Maintenance Question is from Sheila in upstate New York.

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Question: My orchid flower buds shrivel and fall off my orchids before they open?  Why?

Orchid, Orchids, Bud Blast

Answer:

Great question Sheila!  Healthy orchid plants that have buds fall off the stem before they have a chance to open are suffering from “bud blast”.  This can be caused due to rapid changes in environment and even air pollutants such as smoke, paint thinner or aerosol sprays and ethylene gas that is released from ripening fruit.

Are you moving your orchid around the house daily?  Is there a cold or hot draft that might be affecting it?  Or is it sitting on the kitchen table near your fruit bowl?

You can read a bit more about how temperature changes affect orchids in my earlier post: Orchid Flowers and Bud Blast.

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Have an orchid related question you’d like me to answer?  Send me an email!  Check out the Contact Carol tab above for more info.

Don’t forget to sign up for Free Orchid Care Tips with my pal Ryan.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

Orchid Care, Orchids, Orchids Care, Growing Orchids, Orchid Care and Maintenance

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Orchid Care : Diseases – Crown Rot

In today’s orchid care post, I’ll be sharing a few tips on how to care for orchids with crown rot.  You may have seen plants at your local grocery store suffering from crown rot (I see it all too often) or perhaps you’ve had to treat an orchid with crown rot in your own home.  Treating crown rot can be extremely difficult, but the more we know about it, the better we can treat, even prevent it!

Orchids are susceptible to various types of rot including leaf rot, root rot and crown rot.  Monopodial orchids (Phalaenopsis and Vandas) are most suseptible to crown rot—a fungal infection that is caused by water pooling in the center (or crown) of the plant.

Crown rot can cause immense damage to an orchid and must be treated immediately.  One solution  is to use hydrogen peroxide (3%).  You can treat the crown rot with full strength hydrogen peroxide, repeating every 2-3 days until the rot no longer fizzes and bubbles with the hydrogen peroxide application.  Sprinkling cinnamon from your kitchen cabinets can also be used to treat the fungus.

Of course, prevention is the best medicine, even when it comes to orchids.  Crown rot is 100% preventable.  Water your orchids early in the day, so that the plant has time to dry off before night time and provide your plants with proper air circulation.  Most importantly, always take the time to inspect the crown of your orchids regularly.  Take a tissue and soak up any water that has pooled in the crown.

(If you do decide to remove severely damaged orchid leaves, make sure you sterilize the blade for each cut.)

Want to receive more tips on caring for orchids?  Sign up for Ryan’s Free Orchid Care Email Tips–you’ll learn everything you need to know straight from the expert!

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :-)
The Orchid Care Lady

Orchid Care, Orchids, Orchids Care, Growing Orchids, Orchid Care and Maintenance

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Orchid Care & Ice Cubes :Why You Should Not Use Ice To Water Your Orchids…

There is a big debate going on out there in the world of orchid care. The topic? Orchid care and ice cubes.

I know this method works for some, but most AOS orchid growers I’ve spoken to live by the drench and drain method. (You can read my post on watering orchids if you haven’t already read it: Orchid Care: How to Water An Orchid.)

So, what’s so wrong about watering your orchid with ice?

Officially….nothing. I couldn’t find any hard evidence that proved watering your orchid with ice would cause serious damage to your plant.

Why should you not use ice to water your orchids?

There are a host of reasons….

1. Most experienced orchid growers will tell you that the first major reason would be the sudden change in temperature. A rapid change in temperature can cause orchid bud blast, that’s why I recommend watering orchids with room temperature water.

2. Cold and wet roots can invite pests and diseases. These problems can spread from plant to plant.

3. Overwatering Orchid/Underwatering Orchid issues. Ice cubes vary in size and the environment varies from one windowsill/counter/shelf to another.  So, using 3 ice cubes every other day might be too little for one orchid and too much for another.

My orchids have been happy for years using the drench and drain method.  I’ve watched them bloom year after year and have had few (if any) water related problems.

What do you think about using ice cubes to water your orchids?  Does it work for you?

Of course, everything you need to know to about orchid care is covered in Ryan’s Orchids Made Easy book. (Including a few VERY important things you need to watch out for involving watering and temperature— and one thing even experienced growers often overlook.)  Sign up for his Free Orchid Care newsletter HERE.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

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Orchid Flowers and Bud Blast

Orchid, Orchids, Bud BlastOrchids are sensitive to any sudden changes in their environment – and they’re particularly sensitive to rapid changes in temperature.

One of the most common reasons why a newly purchased orchid will suddenly lose its flowers is because the plant goes through “shock” when it is suddenly introduced to a new environment – namely your home.  Healthy orchid plants with buds that shrivel and fall off the stem before they have a chance to open suffer what’s called “bud blast.”

The photo to the left is of a phalaenopsis orchid suffering bud blast.

You can prevent bud blast and flower blast by closely monitoring your orchids temperature changes (see my special post, Orchid Care and Maintenance Tips : Temperatures for Orchids for more info.)  Protect orchids from sudden cool and heat temperatures changes like strong air conditioning/heating or drafts from windows/doors.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :-)
The Orchid Care Lady

Orchid Care, Orchids, Orchids Care, Growing Orchids, Orchid Care and Maintenance

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Growing Orchids Indoors for Beginners : Bringing Your New Orchid Home

As I mentioned in yesterday’s post (Growing Orchids : Selecting a Healthy Orchid, read it here), today I’ll be sharing a tip I learned from Ryan’s Orchid Care email tips that saved my entire orchid collection from death!

I don’t want to keep you in suspense too long–especially since I know it will help save your orchids too!

Now, this orchid care tip is incredibly simple, but I can’t emphasize how important it is to follow.

Growing Orchids, orchid care, growing orchids for beginners, growing orchids indoors, orchid care and maintenanceALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS quarantine your new orchids from your existing plants for at least 3 weeks.  I don’t care if you bought it from the most reputable orchid dealer in the world!  NEVER place a new orchid near your other indoor/outdoor orchid plants.  Separating your plants for at least 3 weeks will help you inspect them for any signs of orchid pests or diseases that might not have been visible when the plant first arrived in your home.  Remember to pay close attention to the underside of the leaves, 3 weeks is just enough time to see if any insect eggs have hatched.

If you’ve ever dealt with orchid diseases and orchid pests you will realize how frustrating and difficult it can sometimes be to have to care for orchids that are “sick”.  Keep your orchids healthy by providing them the ideal care environments : temperature, humidity, light, water, etc.  AND REMEMBER, always quarantine your new orchids!

For more detailed information, I recommend you read Chapter 2 in Ryan’s book Orchids Made Easy.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :-)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

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Orchid Problems : Overwatering Your Orchid

One of the most common orchid care problems beginner orchid growers typically face is overwatering.

Here’s a question I received via email from Bev :

I have a Phalaenopsis Orchid. I think I have over watered it and now all the blooms have fallen off except one.  It’s in a plastic pot with moss and it is damp. What should I do?  Look forward to hearing from you.  Regards, Bev L.

Here’s a photograph of an overwatered phalaenopsis :

Orchid Care, Orchid Problems, How to Care for Orchids, Orchid Care and Maintenance

Orchids can become sick and even be killed when overwatered. Therefore, it is extremely important to determine whether improper watering is damaging your orchid. Don’t know if you are watering your orchid plant correctly? Check out my special Orchid Care and Maintenance post to learn how to water your orchid.

Diagnose

What are the signs of  an overwatered orchid?

Pleated, soft, yellow leaves are a sign of overwatering. Your orchid may also suffer bud blast (all of the buds fall off before they open). When examined out of the pot, orchid roots may be soggy, mushy and black.

Troubleshooting

What should I do if my orchid has been overwatered?

If the damage on the roots in limited, you can simply repot your orchid in a clay pot and fresh orchid potting mix (bark based if possible) and adjust the frequency of your watering schedule—making sure to water only in the mornings. Don’t forget to adjust temperature and humidity levels if necessary.

On the other hand, if the damage of the roots is severe, you will need to remove the diseased portions of the roots with a sterilized blade and carefully repot the plant in a clay pot and bark potting mix (otherwise you rise losing your orchid.) I recommend you refer to Ryan’s “My orchid has been over/underwatered. Now what do I do?” section in his book Orchids Made Easy, for detailed information.

Warmest wishes from sunny Florida,

Carol :)
The Orchid Care Lady

Carol the Orchid Care Lady

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